Imperial eagle

Imperial eagle
Identification
75-84 cm. Large, dark eagle. usually dark brown with white scapular markings and pale golden-cream backside. gray base to tail. Juvenile brown weakening to pale buff with dark flight feathers. Shows flat wings on the wing. Similar spp. Aquila chrysaetos A. chrysaetos is paler with less clearly bi-coloured tail. Holds wings in two-dimensional "V" form. field Eagle A. nipalensis lacks pale rusty yellow ventral space, bi-coloured tail and pale scapulars. Voice continual barking

Imperial eagle

Distribution and population

Aquila heliaca breeds in Oesterreich, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, China, European nation, Macedonia, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Turkey and Ukrayina (Heredia 1996). Breeding has not been tried however presumably happens in Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Bosna i Hercegovina and Herzegovina, Croatia, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Mongolia, Pakistan, Romania, Tajikistan, land and Asian nation. On passage and in winter, birds area unit found within the geographic region, geographic area south to United Republic of Tanzania, the peninsula, the Indian landmass and south and east Asia (from Asian nation to Korea). the eu population includes one,800-2,200 pairs (Demerdzhiev et al. 2011). This range is significantly beyond previous estimates of one,051-1,619 pairs were according in 2000 (Horváth et al.
Imperial eagle
2002) and one,110-1,624 pairs in 2008 (BirdLife International 2008, Barove and Derhé 2011), and is partially as a result of exaggerated survey effort instead of a genuinely massive population increase. There was a fast decline in Europe and doubtless in Asia within the last half of the twentieth century. Recently the Central European population (177-192 pairs principally in Magyarorszag and Slovakia) seems to own been increasing (Horváth et al. 2005, Demerdzhiev et al. 2011) as a results of conservation efforts, though the bulk of the threats to the species persist (D. Horal in litt. 2012). within the last six years the prevalence of abuse incidents considerably exaggerated (Horváth et al. 2011), with quite fifty jap Imperial Eagles poisoned in Magyarorszag (M. Horváth in litt. 2012). The Balkan population (76-132 pairs principally in Republic of Bulgaria and Macedonia [Demerdzhiev et al. 2011] ) is seemingly stable (although the last well-tried breeding in Hellenic Republic transpire in 1993). Recent surveys in Azerbajdzhan Republic found comparatively high densities within the north-western plains, estimating 50-60 pairs at intervals a 6000 km2 study space (Horváth et al. 2007), and a complete population size of 50-150 pairs (Horváth et al. 2008

Imperial eagle

Sultanov 2010). this means that the Caucasian population could are underestimated (it was antecedently assumed that but fifty pairs bred in Azerbajdzhan Republic and Georgia (Horváth et al. 2007). Populations within the Volga Region of Russia area unit comparatively stable, however area unit suspected to say no within the future as a result of the presence of threats at breeding sites (M. Korepov and R. Bekmansurov in litt. 2012). a minimum of 1/2 the globe population (and presumably more) breeds in Russia (900-1,000 pairs [Belik et al. 2002]) and Kazakhstan (750-800 pairs [Bragin 1999]). more moderen surveys conducted by Karyakin et al. (2008, 2011) calculable three,000-3,500 pairs in Russia and three,500-4,000 pairs in Kazakhstan. but these figures have nonetheless to be confirmed and may be treated with caution. though these populations presently appear to be stable, the Russian population has been foreseen to say no within the next 3 to 5 years

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